Yama & Niyama Series

Santosha | How Contentment Can Radically Change Our Lives

Santosha | How Contentment Can Radically Change Our Lives

Welcome back to the yamas and niyamas series after a little break. We're moving right along, and this week Santosha is up. Santosha means contentment in Sanskrit and asks us to take refuge within a calm center. 

In order to practice contentment, we have to move towards opening our heart to gratitude for what we have in this current moment. We are asked to be thankful and practice not seeking.

Saucha | How Purity Allows Us to Fully Experience Life

Saucha | How Purity Allows Us to Fully Experience Life

Hello beautiful friends, and welcome back for the first niyama. This week we transition from covering the yamas, all the "restraints" to the niyamas, or the "observances." And, what a better way than to talk about Saucha, which means purity in Sanskrit. 

Saucha can be broken down into two different areas of bringing purity into our lives. The first is what most might think of - to pure our bodies, thoughts, and words. Like many things, we must first start with cleansing ourselves in order to bring purity into our lives overall.

Aparigraha | What We Try to Possess, Will Possess Us

Aparigraha | What We Try to Possess, Will Possess Us

This week marks the fifth and final yama! Hard to believe we're already through the yamas and will be moving onto the niyamas next week.For the final yama, we'll be covering Aparigraha, or the tenant of non-possessiveness. Aparigraha asks us to not cling to things of this world. The belief is that all things come and go and holding onto things will only lead to suffering. We are allowed to enjoy the pleasures of life and what we have in this moment but must do this without becoming attached. Only then can we be free to truly enjoy this life.

Brahmacharya | Reversing Overindulgence by "Going After Brahman"

Brahmacharya | Reversing Overindulgence by "Going After Brahman"

Here we go, loves, week four of the yamas and niyamas series. This week we're covering Brahmacharya, or the tenant of non-excess. This one is interesting and stands out from the others, because when you translate it from Sanskrit, it literally means "going after Brahman." A Brahman in Hinduism is a teacher or guru, and some think Brahmacharya is meant to mean " walking with God," whatever God means for you.

Brahmacharya holds to an outlook of holiness, or the concept of sacredness, rather than indulgence. We talked about the concept of "enough," which goes hand in hand with this tenant, in last week's post. So, if you're interested in learning more about how to view your current life as being enough, I recommend reading that one, as well. This week's tenant asks us to walk through life seeing ourselves and all our experiences as being sacred, to be willing to "turn on to the wonders of life."