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Brahmacharya | Reversing Overindulgence by "Going After Brahman"

Brahmacharya | Reversing Overindulgence by "Going After Brahman"

Here we go, loves, week four of the yamas and niyamas series. This week we're covering Brahmacharya, or the tenant of non-excess. This one is interesting and stands out from the others, because when you translate it from Sanskrit, it literally means "going after Brahman." A Brahman in Hinduism is a teacher or guru, and some think Brahmacharya is meant to mean " walking with God," whatever God means for you.

Brahmacharya holds to an outlook of holiness, or the concept of sacredness, rather than indulgence. We talked about the concept of "enough," which goes hand in hand with this tenant, in last week's post. So, if you're interested in learning more about how to view your current life as being enough, I recommend reading that one, as well. This week's tenant asks us to walk through life seeing ourselves and all our experiences as being sacred, to be willing to "turn on to the wonders of life."

Satya | Having the Bravery to be Truthful

Satya | Having the Bravery to be Truthful

Hello Beautiful Friends,

Welcome back for the second week of the ten post series all about the yamas and niyamas of the eight limbs of yoga. The second tenant of the yamas is all about truthfulness, also known as Satya. As is true for Ahimsa, Satya calls for us to be truthful to both others and ourselves, a theme you might find common throughout all the tenants. 

Before we dive in, an important concept to keep in mind is that truthfulness does not mean that we should be brutally honest in all situations to all people all the time. Rather, think of truthfulness as being married with non-violence. Ahimsa and Satya are in this beautiful relationship, supporting and grounding each other. Your truth should not be used as a weapon with which to wield around as you please.

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Hello Spiritual Warriors,

Welcome to the first post in a series all about the yamas and niyamas, two of the eight limbs of yoga. I'm so excited to get this kicked off! If you haven't seen the introduction post, I would start there so you know what this series will be all about and the book I'll be following to guide these posts.

The first tenet in the yamas is Ahimsa, or non-violence. This is probably my favorite one out of all ten, so it's exciting that we're starting here. Let's begin with a definition: Ahimsa can be thought of living in a non-violent, peaceful, and compassionate way. This includes other beings, as well as animals, the earth, and even ourselves. Ahimsa asks us to "step lightly, do no harm, and to honor the relationship we have with the earth, with each other, and with ourselves" (taken from our text, The Yamas & Niyamas by Deborah Adele). That sounds lovely, right? Let's unpack it a bit, though, to better understand how a life like this is possible.

The Power of Doing Things Now

The Power of Doing Things Now

Hello Beautiful Souls,

How many of you are guilty of putting things off, saying oh, I'll do that later? I certainly am! Just pushing things aside, saying we can do it tomorrow, is super easy to do, but what affect does that have on our tomorrow? Honestly, I've found that putting things off just continues to build and build until I've put off a million things for a month (sometimes more), and now I have a huge problem to deal with. 

The bigger issue here, aside from there being a messy house or some dirty dishes, is that this can easily lead to us putting off our dreams and aspirations. For me, blogging fell into this category for awhile. The work I thought I would need to put into it and the fear of others reading my thoughts and words allowed me to keep putting off writing, until I realized I wasn't doing something that could have tremendous benefit.