eight limbs

Saucha | How Purity Allows Us to Fully Experience Life

Saucha | How Purity Allows Us to Fully Experience Life

Hello beautiful friends, and welcome back for the first niyama. This week we transition from covering the yamas, all the "restraints" to the niyamas, or the "observances." And, what a better way than to talk about Saucha, which means purity in Sanskrit. 

Saucha can be broken down into two different areas of bringing purity into our lives. The first is what most might think of - to pure our bodies, thoughts, and words. Like many things, we must first start with cleansing ourselves in order to bring purity into our lives overall.

Satya | Having the Bravery to be Truthful

Satya | Having the Bravery to be Truthful

Hello Beautiful Friends,

Welcome back for the second week of the ten post series all about the yamas and niyamas of the eight limbs of yoga. The second tenant of the yamas is all about truthfulness, also known as Satya. As is true for Ahimsa, Satya calls for us to be truthful to both others and ourselves, a theme you might find common throughout all the tenants. 

Before we dive in, an important concept to keep in mind is that truthfulness does not mean that we should be brutally honest in all situations to all people all the time. Rather, think of truthfulness as being married with non-violence. Ahimsa and Satya are in this beautiful relationship, supporting and grounding each other. Your truth should not be used as a weapon with which to wield around as you please.

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Hello Spiritual Warriors,

Welcome to the first post in a series all about the yamas and niyamas, two of the eight limbs of yoga. I'm so excited to get this kicked off! If you haven't seen the introduction post, I would start there so you know what this series will be all about and the book I'll be following to guide these posts.

The first tenet in the yamas is Ahimsa, or non-violence. This is probably my favorite one out of all ten, so it's exciting that we're starting here. Let's begin with a definition: Ahimsa can be thought of living in a non-violent, peaceful, and compassionate way. This includes other beings, as well as animals, the earth, and even ourselves. Ahimsa asks us to "step lightly, do no harm, and to honor the relationship we have with the earth, with each other, and with ourselves" (taken from our text, The Yamas & Niyamas by Deborah Adele). That sounds lovely, right? Let's unpack it a bit, though, to better understand how a life like this is possible.

A Journey Through the Yamas and Niyamas

A Journey Through the Yamas and Niyamas

Announcing a series exploring the yamas and niyamas, the tenets that make up the yogic path. Each week I'll be sharing an explanation of one tenet, my reflections on how I'm incorporating this into my life, and journal prompts to get you started down the path to living an ethical yoga life.

Hello Lovelies,

So, did you know that yoga is more than just those pretty poses you see plastered all over Instagram? Did you know there's more than the physical asana practice, and some people actually form their spirituality and daily life around the teachings of yoga? These are the aspects we rarely talk about but are just as important. Let me give you a bit of a back story and explain what I mean.

With the completion of yoga teacher training in 2016, I've become interested in learning more about religion and spirituality. Opening myself back up to religion has felt strange in some respects, but also healing in other ways. You could probably say that the healing I've experienced through developing a yoga practice has facilitated this renewal of interest in spirituality. This has led me to start reading about Hinduism, with its myriad deities, and the yamas and niyamas that are associated with yoga.