courage

Letting Go Isn't as Easy as it Sounds

Letting Go Isn't as Easy as it Sounds

Just let that sh*t go. We hear it all the time. This simple phrase meant to be a symbolic releasing of our problems. Surrendering our worries into the universe and trusting it will all work out.

I was one of the people that said this so often. It was a motto I thought I lived by, but when I actually thought about what I've "let go" of in my life, it was way more complicated than just a single moment of release.

Ishvara Pranidhana | Finding the Wisdom to Accept Our Path in Life

Ishvara Pranidhana | Finding the Wisdom to Accept Our Path in Life

Welcome to the tenth and final post of the yama and niyama series. We're finishing things out with such a great tenant, Ishvara Pranidhana, meaning surrender. It feels like all the previous nine tenants have led us up to this final one of surrendering to what life brings our way. Let's get in to what the tenant of Ishvara Pranidhana asks us to bring into our lives.

The text we've been following, The Yamas & Niyamas by Deborah Adele, provides such a fantastic explanation of Ishvara Pranidhana. It states that the tenant of surrender proposes that there is a divine force at work in our lives. This can take on different forms for everyone, whether you attribute this higher being to a god, nature, or just some force, the belief is that this force is greater than we are and cares deeply for us. Surrender invites us to be active participants of our lives, being present and fluid with each moment, while also appreciating the magnitude and mystery of life. Ultimately, this tenant invites us to open our hearts and accept the higher purpose of our being.

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Hello Spiritual Warriors,

Welcome to the first post in a series all about the yamas and niyamas, two of the eight limbs of yoga. I'm so excited to get this kicked off! If you haven't seen the introduction post, I would start there so you know what this series will be all about and the book I'll be following to guide these posts.

The first tenet in the yamas is Ahimsa, or non-violence. This is probably my favorite one out of all ten, so it's exciting that we're starting here. Let's begin with a definition: Ahimsa can be thought of living in a non-violent, peaceful, and compassionate way. This includes other beings, as well as animals, the earth, and even ourselves. Ahimsa asks us to "step lightly, do no harm, and to honor the relationship we have with the earth, with each other, and with ourselves" (taken from our text, The Yamas & Niyamas by Deborah Adele). That sounds lovely, right? Let's unpack it a bit, though, to better understand how a life like this is possible.

Meditation & Dissociation

Meditation & Dissociation

Hello Lovelies,

Today I want to talk a bit about meditation and dissociation. Recently, I had surgery done on my foot, which required me to be homebound for a week. Check out my last post for details. For the first few days I just rested, took things easy, and allowed my body the space it needed to heal. But, by the fifth day I started to get pretty sore and restless. Sitting on the couch for several days sounds nice but has consequences for our bodies and minds. So, on the fifth day, I decided to spend some time meditating and doing some mild, restorative yoga. My body desperately needed the movement and my mind needed the grounding and calm. However, something very interesting happened when I sat and began to calm my mind.

As I settled in to begin a guided mediation (shout out to Headspace!) and closed my eyes to turn my awareness inward, I noticed that my mind was going to be way more difficult to quiet than normal. The few days of going under sedation, having my foot cut open, sitting, and taking several medications left my mind feeling loose and floaty. The body-awareness I once had seemed to have disappeared.