brahmacharya

A Master Guide to Practicing the Yamas & Niyamas

A Master Guide to Practicing the Yamas & Niyamas

Surprise, another post on the yamas and niyamas! I know I said last week that we were wrapping up the Yama and NIyama series, but I decided to include a bonus post. In completing the individual posts, one for each tenant, I thought it might be really useful to have one final post that provided an overview of all ten, creating a master list that you can come back to as you practice these tenants in your daily life.

So, what I've done below is provide a list of all ten tenants with short descriptions and what practicing each tenant will bring into your life. Each one is also linked to its corresponding full post; this way if you'd like to be reminded what a certain tenant is all about you can easily get to that post to refresh your memory. I hope this can be used as a guide for the whole series and your continued practice in living out the yogic philosophy. 

Brahmacharya | Reversing Overindulgence by "Going After Brahman"

Brahmacharya | Reversing Overindulgence by "Going After Brahman"

Here we go, loves, week four of the yamas and niyamas series. This week we're covering Brahmacharya, or the tenant of non-excess. This one is interesting and stands out from the others, because when you translate it from Sanskrit, it literally means "going after Brahman." A Brahman in Hinduism is a teacher or guru, and some think Brahmacharya is meant to mean " walking with God," whatever God means for you.

Brahmacharya holds to an outlook of holiness, or the concept of sacredness, rather than indulgence. We talked about the concept of "enough," which goes hand in hand with this tenant, in last week's post. So, if you're interested in learning more about how to view your current life as being enough, I recommend reading that one, as well. This week's tenant asks us to walk through life seeing ourselves and all our experiences as being sacred, to be willing to "turn on to the wonders of life."