acceptance

Ishvara Pranidhana | Finding the Wisdom to Accept Our Path in Life

Ishvara Pranidhana | Finding the Wisdom to Accept Our Path in Life

Welcome to the tenth and final post of the yama and niyama series. We're finishing things out with such a great tenant, Ishvara Pranidhana, meaning surrender. It feels like all the previous nine tenants have led us up to this final one of surrendering to what life brings our way. Let's get in to what the tenant of Ishvara Pranidhana asks us to bring into our lives.

The text we've been following, The Yamas & Niyamas by Deborah Adele, provides such a fantastic explanation of Ishvara Pranidhana. It states that the tenant of surrender proposes that there is a divine force at work in our lives. This can take on different forms for everyone, whether you attribute this higher being to a god, nature, or just some force, the belief is that this force is greater than we are and cares deeply for us. Surrender invites us to be active participants of our lives, being present and fluid with each moment, while also appreciating the magnitude and mystery of life. Ultimately, this tenant invites us to open our hearts and accept the higher purpose of our being.

Satya | Having the Bravery to be Truthful

Satya | Having the Bravery to be Truthful

Hello Beautiful Friends,

Welcome back for the second week of the ten post series all about the yamas and niyamas of the eight limbs of yoga. The second tenant of the yamas is all about truthfulness, also known as Satya. As is true for Ahimsa, Satya calls for us to be truthful to both others and ourselves, a theme you might find common throughout all the tenants. 

Before we dive in, an important concept to keep in mind is that truthfulness does not mean that we should be brutally honest in all situations to all people all the time. Rather, think of truthfulness as being married with non-violence. Ahimsa and Satya are in this beautiful relationship, supporting and grounding each other. Your truth should not be used as a weapon with which to wield around as you please.

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Ahimsa | Living in Non-Violence

Hello Spiritual Warriors,

Welcome to the first post in a series all about the yamas and niyamas, two of the eight limbs of yoga. I'm so excited to get this kicked off! If you haven't seen the introduction post, I would start there so you know what this series will be all about and the book I'll be following to guide these posts.

The first tenet in the yamas is Ahimsa, or non-violence. This is probably my favorite one out of all ten, so it's exciting that we're starting here. Let's begin with a definition: Ahimsa can be thought of living in a non-violent, peaceful, and compassionate way. This includes other beings, as well as animals, the earth, and even ourselves. Ahimsa asks us to "step lightly, do no harm, and to honor the relationship we have with the earth, with each other, and with ourselves" (taken from our text, The Yamas & Niyamas by Deborah Adele). That sounds lovely, right? Let's unpack it a bit, though, to better understand how a life like this is possible.

Loving our Dark Side

Loving our Dark Side

Hello Warriors,

Today I want to talk about our dark sides. You know what I'm talking about, that side of you that you try to hide, pretend it's not there, don't dare show to other people. Ring any bells? This can run the gamut from hiding a bad habit or a specific part of our personality to repressing a traumatic past or an addiction we're struggling with, maybe ways we've hurt others. Either way, the issue here is that we refuse to put our guard down, allowing others to see us for who we truly are and sometimes, we actually hide these parts of ourselves so well that we don't even see them ourselves. 

So, why is this a bad thing? We all hide things from people and show them only the parts that we choose, right? While I think many people do this to some extent, the shame in hiding part of yourself is the message behind it. What you're telling yourself while hiding is that your entire being isn't worthy enough to be accepted or loved by others. The bigger meaning underlying hiding our dark side is the problem here. It ends up leading to shame and a cycle of lying to others and ourselves.